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Friday, August 23, 2019
Monday, 25 February 2019 18:18

Keeping Your Baby Safe While Sleeping

The safest position for infants to sleep is on their back. THis is according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Sleeping on the back has been shown to reduce the incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Since the AAP began recommending that all newborn babies age 1 or under be put to sleep on their backs at night and during the day for naps, the rate of of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrom) has declined more than 50 percent – with no increase in choking.

Sleeping Infant

While it can be a challenge to get your newborn in the habit of falling asleep on her back, in time your infant will adapt to this safe baby sleeping position. Of course, once your child is able to roll over, she may reposition herself.

It's also important to make sure your baby spends supervised time playing on his stomach every day. This is important to help with motor development and prevents flat head syndrome.

Here are some other tips to help your infant sleep safely and comfortably.
  • Choose a firm surface, preferably a safety-approved crib mattress. Use a fitted sheet and avoid placing the baby on soft surfaces like pillows or throws.
  • A one-piece sleeper or sleep-sack is a good alternative to blankets.
  • Keep the crib clear of soft toys, pillows blankets and other soft objects.
  • Babies should not sleep in a bed, couch or chair with other adults or children. A sofa or chair is the riskiest place for an infant to sleep. If sleeping in the same room, babies are safest in a bassinet, cradle or crib. Only bring your baby into your bed to feed or comfort them.
  • Ensure that the crib is not too cold or hot by monitoring the temperature and keeping infants away from vents, open windows and other sources of drafts.
  • Pacifiers have been show to reduce the risk of SIDS, but don't force the baby to use a pacifier if it doesn't want to.



Published in Blog

Summer is here and for many families the calendar is filled with lots of outdoor activities. Because summer in Minnesota can mean an increased risk for certain injuries and illnesses, we've put together a list of health tips so you and your family can spend more time relaxing at the lake and less time at the doctor this summer.

Sun and Heat

After a long cold winter Minnesotans relish the nice hot days outside. However, the sun and heat can pose a real danger, particularly to young children and the elderly. Of course, the best protection from the sun is to avoid direct exposure, but the next best option is to wear light colored, UV protective clothing and a wide brim hat. Even when the sky is partly cloudy UV rays can be harmful, so use a suntan lotion with an SPF of 15 or higher, and remember to reapply it every two hours or after swimming. If you do get sunburn, acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help with the pain, while lotions containing aloe vera can cool and sooth red skin.

Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are another danger that can come with outdoor activities. You can minimize your risk by taking frequent breaks from the sun and heat and staying hydrated with non-alcoholic beverages. Never leave young children or pets in a car unattended, even if you're just running a quick errand.

Barbecue Grills

Because barbecue pose a real danger to children, they should never be left unattended. Teach children to stay away from grills. Many small, portable grills can be knocked over easily, so keep pets and kids away while cooking. It's also a good idea to keep a garden hose or bucket of water nearby. When cleaning a grill, avoid metal bristle brushes that can break off and be accidentally ingested with the cooked food.

Swimming Pools and Lakes

While swimming in a cool lake or swimming pool is a prefect complement to a hot summer day, it's important that everyone know who is responsible for watching young children around water. Even if they know how to swim well, never allow a child to swim unattended. Don't assume that others are watching out for them. Children who cannot swim should have approved life jackets (not inflatable devices). If a child is missing near the pool, always look for them underwater first.

Fireworks

Children should never be allowed to play with firecrackers, rockets or other fireworks. While sparklers may seem harmless, but they can cause serious burns. Teach children to never pick up "duds" or fireworks that have failed to go off.


 

Published in Blog
Monday, 24 August 2015 19:01

Parkway's Back to School Health Checklist

With the start of school approaching it's important to be prepared to reduce stress and make sure your child stays healthy and safe during the school year. Here are some things to check prior to the start of the school year.

1. Health History Records

Have your child's medical history and emergency contact information organized and available for your family and your child's school or day care provider. Have printed instructions for the caretaker to take with them to the emergency department if needed. Communicate with the school nurse about any medical conditions that may require medications or other supervision.

2. Schedule back to school physicals and vaccinations

Your doctor will ensure that your child is up-to-date on all their vaccinations. In addition, flu shots may be available depending on when you schedule your appointment. Be sure to inform your doctor if your child will be playing any sports.

3. Schedule Dental, Vision and Hearing Screenings

Vision and hearing screenings are especially important for kids starting their first year of school. 

4. Rehearse the Route to School

If your child will be walking to school take time to show them how to safely cross intersections only at designated crosswalks.

If your child rides the bus, pick a safe pick up/drop off spot that can be clearly seen by other adults and preferably in a group with other children.

If your child will be riding a bike (or skateboard or scooter) make sure they wear a helmet and have appropriate safety gear.

5. Have an Emergency Plan

Make sure your child knows who to contact in an emergency. For older children having a phone for emergency use can also be a good idea.

 

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"We have been patients of Parkway for over 25 years. We drive over 45 minutes to the clinic because the folks at Parkway are the best. We have been blessed by the quality of care and level of attention that our friends and we have received over the years. Our friends and family who we have referred still tell us thank you. Dr. Hamilton and the other doctors are outstanding. When was the last time your doctor called to see how treatment was going? I highly recommend Dr. Hamilton and the Parkway Family Physicians Clinic.”
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