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Thursday, March 21, 2019
Friday, 01 March 2019 20:30

Are You At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes, less commonly called adult-onset diabetes, makes up about 95 percent of all diabetes cases. While more common in middle age and older adults, it can also occur during childhood. Being overweight and inactive are the main risk factors for developing diabetes, but there are many other risk factors, including:

  • Being 45 or older
  • Having a family history of diabetes
  • Having a family background that is African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander American
  • Having blood pressure
  • Having high cholesterol
  • Having a history of cardiovascular disease

Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not make or use insulin efficiently. Insulin is a hormone that allows your cells to process glucose for energy. When there is too much glucose in your blood it can lead to serious health problems affecting your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Because a person can have Type 2 Diabetes for years and not know it, it's important to recognize the often subtle onset of one or more of the following symptoms and see your doctor if you notice any of the following symptoms:

  • Increased thirst, especially at night
  • Increased hunger
  • Weight loss without reducing caloric intake.
  • Feeling tired
  • Blurry vision
  • Sores that are slow to heal

Have questions about diabetes? Talk with your doctor. They can help access your risk and perform blood tests to determine if you have diabetes or are at increased risk. 

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 12 December 2018 04:20

4 Tips For a Healthier and Happier Holiday Season

4 Tips For a Healthier and Happier Holiday Season

The holidays are a time of year when we all want to feel our best. But they can also be a time when our health can be comprimised by colds and flu, stress and over indulging in holiday treats.

Here are 5 tips to stay healthy this holiday season:

1. Avoid Germs

Most cold viruses are spread from hand to mouth. When traveling by air or out at the mall shopping and dining during the holidays, there are coutless points of contact with germ covered surfaces. By carrying an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and using it regularly, you can reduce the risk of catching a cold.

2. Stay Hydrated

Low humidity during the winter months makes our airways more prone to viral and bacterial infections. Flying on airplanes and traveling to high altitudes further decreases the humidity in the air.

Drinking plenty of water and avoiding alcohol and caffeine will keep your mucous membranes moist so they can better keep the germs out of your system. When flying, drink 8 ounces of water for every hour you're in the air.

3. Eating Healthy

The holidays are time when we want to endulge in holiday treats food and deal the consequences of a few extra pounds until after the new year. To control over your caloric intake, use a salad plate to keep the portions smaller. Sucking on hard candy will add fewer calories than rich cookies or cakes.

4. Stay Well Rested

A study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that people who slept at least eight hours nightly were about three times less likely to catch a cold than those who snoozed for less than seven. Staying rested will help your body's immune system fight off infections, reduce your stress level and improve your mood.
Published in Blog
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