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Tuesday, June 18, 2019
Saturday, 22 December 2018 21:47

Preventing Food Poisoning

Food poisoning is relatively common, with 1 in 6 Americans contracting some form of food poisoning every year, resulting in 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


Preventing Food Poisoning

Ingestion of food that contains a bacterium, virus, parasite, or prion can cause adverse symptoms in the body. Those symptoms may be limited to vomiting or diarrhea or they may involve other organs such as the kidney, brain, or muscle. While about 250 types of bacteria, viruses, and parasites can lead to food poisoning, the most common foodborne illnesses in the United States are caused by Norovirus, and the bacteria Campylobacter, Clostridium perfringens, and Salmonella.

What Are The Symptoms Of Food Poisoning?

The symptoms of food poisoning will be obvious in most cases, and include:
  •  Abdominal cramps
  •  Diarrhea
  •  Vomiting
  •  Mild fever
  •  Weakness
  •  Nausea
  •  Headaches
  •  Loss of appetite
Most cases of food poisoning last only a couple of days and the symptoms usually resolve on their own. If symptoms persist longer than two days, or the symptoms are more serious, you should contact a health care professional.

Symptoms of potentially life-threatening food poisoning include:
  •  Diarrhea that continues for more than three days
  •  A fever higher than 101.5°F
  •  Difficulty seeing or speaking
  •  Severe dehydration
  •  Bloody urine

How Can You Prevent Food Poisoning?

First, always wash your hands frequently when preparing food. Wash cutting boards and knives with hot soapy water after handling raw meat, poultry, seafood, or eggs. Avoid wooden cutting boards, which can be more difficult to clean.

Pay attention to the expiration date on diary, meat and eggs and avoid them at room temperature. Instad, keep food refrigerated until it is ready to use. Thaw meat and seafood in the refrigerator or microwave.

While raw meat and poultry are some of the most common sources of food borne illnesses, produce can also become contaminated with salmonella, listeria and other dangerous bacteria in the field where they are produced and during processing. Be aware of recalls involving meat and produce and thoroughly wash produce. Washing meat and poultry is generally not recommended, as it can spread bacteria in the kitchen.

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 13 June 2018 17:07

Food Safety Tips

The CDC estimates that each year 48 million people get sick from a foodborne illness, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die. Pregnant women, young children, older adults
and people with immune systems weakened from medical conditions are at highest risk from foodborne illnesses.

Keeping your family safe from foodborne illness at home is all about practicing good food handling procedures. Here are some tips to keep your food safe.

  1. Wash hands with warm, soapy water for 20 seconds before and after handling food.
  2. Use clean, disposable gloves if your hands have sores or cuts.
  3. After preparing food thoroughly wash all surfaces that have come in contact with raw food with hot, soapy water. Consider using paper towels to clean contaminated areas, or if you use dishcloths, replace them often and wash them in the hot cycle of your washing machine.
  4. Keep cutting boards clean by washing them in hot, soapy water after each use. Sanitize cutting boards with a solution or 1 tablespoon of bleach to each gallon of water. Most plastic, glass and some solid wood cutting boards can be washed in a dishwasher. Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, they should be replaced.
  5. Always use separate platters and utensils for raw food and prepared food that is being served.
  6. Use a food thermometer to ensure the internal temperature of meats is 145°F degrees for steaks and roasts and a minimum of 160°F degrees for ground beef.
  7. Keep pets, household cleaners, and other chemicals away from food and surfaces used for food.
  8. When cooking outdoors, keep plenty of clean utensils available and pack clean, dry cloths and use disinfectant sprays or wipes to keep food preparation and serving areas clean.
Published in Blog