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Saturday, 22 December 2018 21:47

Preventing Food Poisoning

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Food poisoning is relatively common, with 1 in 6 Americans contracting some form of food poisoning every year, resulting in 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


Preventing Food Poisoning

Ingestion of food that contains a bacterium, virus, parasite, or prion can cause adverse symptoms in the body. Those symptoms may be limited to vomiting or diarrhea or they may involve other organs such as the kidney, brain, or muscle. While about 250 types of bacteria, viruses, and parasites can lead to food poisoning, the most common foodborne illnesses in the United States are caused by Norovirus, and the bacteria Campylobacter, Clostridium perfringens, and Salmonella.

What Are The Symptoms Of Food Poisoning?

The symptoms of food poisoning will be obvious in most cases, and include:
  •  Abdominal cramps
  •  Diarrhea
  •  Vomiting
  •  Mild fever
  •  Weakness
  •  Nausea
  •  Headaches
  •  Loss of appetite
Most cases of food poisoning last only a couple of days and the symptoms usually resolve on their own. If symptoms persist longer than two days, or the symptoms are more serious, you should contact a health care professional.

Symptoms of potentially life-threatening food poisoning include:
  •  Diarrhea that continues for more than three days
  •  A fever higher than 101.5°F
  •  Difficulty seeing or speaking
  •  Severe dehydration
  •  Bloody urine

How Can You Prevent Food Poisoning?

First, always wash your hands frequently when preparing food. Wash cutting boards and knives with hot soapy water after handling raw meat, poultry, seafood, or eggs. Avoid wooden cutting boards, which can be more difficult to clean.

Pay attention to the expiration date on diary, meat and eggs and avoid them at room temperature. Instad, keep food refrigerated until it is ready to use. Thaw meat and seafood in the refrigerator or microwave.

While raw meat and poultry are some of the most common sources of food borne illnesses, produce can also become contaminated with salmonella, listeria and other dangerous bacteria in the field where they are produced and during processing. Be aware of recalls involving meat and produce and thoroughly wash produce. Washing meat and poultry is generally not recommended, as it can spread bacteria in the kitchen.

Read 656 times Last modified on Saturday, 22 December 2018 22:18

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