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Friday, April 10, 2020
Tuesday, 25 September 2018 18:15

Why You Should Get a Flu Shot This Year

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During last year's flu season vaccines prevented an estimated 85,000 flu-related hospitalizations. Even if you had a flu shot last year, it's important that those 6 months and older get the shot every season. While influenza viruses function more or less the same, every year there are different types, or strains, of the flu.

It takes around two weeks after receiving a flu shot for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the influenza virus, so it's best to get your shot before the flu season arrives by late October.

If you live or work with young children, the elderly, or people with certain medical conditions who are more likely to suffer complications from the flu, it's important to get a flu shot, even if you're not in a higher risk category. By doing so you can prevent the spread of the flu to higher risk individuals in the community.

How Does a Flu Shot Work?

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

Are There Side Effects From Flu Shots?

The side effects from a flu shot are minor, and include soreness at the site of the injection, headache, body aches and in some cases fever.

Have questions about flu shots? Give Parkway Family Physicians a call at 651-690-1311.

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